##plugins.themes.bootstrap3.article.main##

Gifted and talented students are known as highly potential students, who always seek for challenging educational circle to ensure such students are able to make progress. Number of different reasons lead to gifted and talented students’ academic underachievement. Thus, there is a need to develop strategies for uplifting the underachieving gifted and talented students and the intervention plan. The intervention plan could differ from one gifted and talented student to another. This study examines gifted and talented students’ underachievement in Chemistry. In this study, both qualitative and quantitative studies were conducted. A survey was carried out involving 63 gifted and talented students from Pusat GENIUS@Pintar Negara. The data obtained was analysed using SPSS. The finding shows that gifted and talented students are interested in learning Chemistry, however continuous motivation from both peers and teachers plays a crucial role in leading towards success.

References

  1. Abelman, R. (2007). Fighting the war on indecency: Mediating TV, internet, and videogame usage among achieving and underachieving gifted children. Roeper Review, 29(2), 100–112.
     Google Scholar
  2. Abu-Hamour, B. & Al-Hmouz, H. (2013). A study of gifted high, moderate, and low achievers in their personal characteristics and attitudes toward school and teachers. International Journal of Special Education, 28(3), 5–15.
     Google Scholar
  3. Abulude, F. O. (2009). Students’ attitudes towards Chemistry in some selected secondary schools in Akure South local government area, Ondo State [Unpublished dissertation]. Usman Dan Fodio University Sokoto.
     Google Scholar
  4. Alexopoulou, A., Batsou, A. & Drigas, A. (2019). Resilience and academic underachievement in gifted students: causes, consequences and strategic methods of prevention and intervention. International Journal of Online and Biomedical Engineering, 15(14), 78–86.
     Google Scholar
  5. Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundation of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.
     Google Scholar
  6. Çakir, L. (2014). The relationship between underachievement of gifted students and their attitudes toward school environment. Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences, 152(1), 1034–1038.
     Google Scholar
  7. Chowdhury, M. A. (2016). Gifted education in science and chemistry: perspectives and insights into teaching, pedagogies, assessments, and psychosocial skills development. Journal for the Education of Gifted Young Scientists, 4(1), 53–66.
     Google Scholar
  8. Dalgety, J. & Coll, R. K. (2007). The influence of first-year chemistry students' learning experiences on their educational choices. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 31(3), 303–328.
     Google Scholar
  9. De Quadros A. L., Da-Silva D. C., Silva F. C., de Andrade F. P., Aleme H. G., Tristão J. C., et al. The knowledge of chemistry in secondary education: difficulties from the teachers’ viewpoint. Educación Química, 2011, 22(3), 232–239. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0187-893X(18)30139-3.
     Google Scholar
  10. Dixon, R. M., Craven, R. G. & Martin, A. J. (2006). Underachievement in a whole city cohort of academically gifted children: What does it look like? Australasian Journal of Gifted Education, 15(2), 9–14.
     Google Scholar
  11. Eisenberg, N., Smith, C. L. & Spinrad, T. L. (2011). Effortful control: Relations with emotion regulation, adjustment, and socialization in childhood. In K. D Vohs & R. F. Baumeister (Eds.) Handbook of Self-Regulation: Research, Theory, and Applications (pp. 263–283). Guilford Press.
     Google Scholar
  12. Fantuzzo, J. & Tighe, E. (2000). A family involvement questionnaire: A multivariate assessment of family participation in early childhood education. Journal of Educational Psychology, 92(2), 367–376.
     Google Scholar
  13. Figg, S. D., Rogers, K. B., McCormick, J. & Low, R. (2012). Differentiating low performance of the gifted learner: Achieving, underachieving, and selective consuming students. Journal of Advanced Academics, 23(1), 53–81.
     Google Scholar
  14. Fredricks J. A., Alfeld, C. & Eccles, J. (2009). Developing and fostering passion in academic and nonacademic domains. Gift Child Quaterly, 54(1), 18–30.
     Google Scholar
  15. Gagne, F. (2000). A Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent. Available online at https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED448544. Accessed on 31.01.2022.
     Google Scholar
  16. Gomendio, M. (2017). Empowering and Enabling Teachers to Improve Equity and Outcomes for All in International Summit on the Teaching Profession, OECD Publishing, Paris. Available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264273238-en. Accessed on 25.01.2022.
     Google Scholar
  17. Greco, T. G. & Greco, C. B. (1987). A hands-on introduction to chemistry for gifted students in the intermediate grades. Journal of Chemical Education, 64(6), 537.
     Google Scholar
  18. Hans, G. N. (2014). Addressing the needs of underachieving students in an extended curriculum programme [Masters’ thesis. University of the Western Cape, South Africa]. Available online at https://etd.uwc.ac.za/bitstream/handle/11394/5120/hans_gn_med_edu_2014.pdf. Accessed on 02.03.2022.
     Google Scholar
  19. Hébert, T. P. & Olenchak, F. R. (2000). Mentors for gifted underachieving males: developing potential and realizing promise. Gifted Child Quarterly, 44(3), 196–207.
     Google Scholar
  20. Heyman, W. B. (1990). The self-perception of a learning disability and its relationship to academic self-concept and self-esteem. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 23(8), 472–475.
     Google Scholar
  21. Hofstein, A. & Naaman, R. M. (2011). High school students’ attitudes toward and interest in learning Chemistry. Educación Química, 22(2), 90–102.
     Google Scholar
  22. Howard, T. C. & Reynolds, R. (2008). Examining parent involvement in reversing the underachievement of African American students in middle-class schools. Educational Foundations, 22(1-2), 79–98.
     Google Scholar
  23. Kennedy, K. & Farley, J. (2018). Counselling gifted students: school-based considerations and strategies. International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education, 10(3), 361–367.
     Google Scholar
  24. Kim, K. H. (2008). Underachievement and creativity: Are gifted underachievers highly creative? Creativity Research Journal, 20(2), 234–242.
     Google Scholar
  25. Lang, Q. C., Wong, A. F. L. & Fraser, Barry J. (2005). Teacher-student interaction and gifted students' attitudes toward chemistry in laboratory classrooms in Singapore. The Journal of Classroom Interaction, 40(1), 18–28.
     Google Scholar
  26. Lee, H. J. (2005). Developing a professional development Program Model based on teachers' Needs. Professional Educator, 27(1-2), 39–49.
     Google Scholar
  27. Lindahl, B. (2003). Changing the subject to get more students to science and technology. Proceedings of the German-ASEAN Science & Technology Network (GAST 11), Travelling Conference, Mauritius.
     Google Scholar
  28. Lu, M., Loyalka, P., Shi, Y., Chang, F., Liu, C. & Rozelle, S. The impact of teacher professional development programs on student achievement in Rural China. Rural Education Action Program Working Paper, 2017, 3, 313.
     Google Scholar
  29. Marsh, H. W., & Craven, R. (1997). Academic self-concept: Beyond the dustbowl. In G. Phye, (Ed.). Handbook of classroom assessment: Learning, achievement, and adjustment (pp. 131–198). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.
     Google Scholar
  30. Masnick, A. M., Valenti, S. S., Cox, B. D. & Osman, C. J. (2010). A multidimensional scaling analysis of students' attitudes about science careers. International Journal of Science Education, 32(5), 653–667.
     Google Scholar
  31. Metzler, J. & Woessmann, L. (2012). The impact of teacher subject knowledge on student achievement: Evidence from within-teacher within-student variation. Journal of Development Economics, 99(2), 486–496.
     Google Scholar
  32. Mofield, Emily & Peters, M. P. (2019). Understanding underachievement: mindset, perfectionism, and achievement attitudes among gifted students. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 42 (2), 107–34.
     Google Scholar
  33. Mokhtar, M. Z., Tarmizi, R. A., Ayub, A. F. & Nawawi, M. (2013). Motivation and performance in learning calculus through problem-based learning. International Journal of Asian social science, 3, 1999–2005.
     Google Scholar
  34. Nwosu, K. C., Okoyoe, C. C. & Onah, U. H. (2018). An interpretive descriptive study of factors affecting academic achievement of underachieving student teachers in Nigeria. Journal of At-Risk, 21(2), 20–29.
     Google Scholar
  35. Obergriesser, S. & Stoeger, H. (2015). The role of emotions, motivation and learning behavior in underachievement and results of an intervention. High Ability Studies, 26, 167–190.
     Google Scholar
  36. Okorie, E. U. & Akubuilo, F. (2013). Towards improving quality of education in chemistry: an investigation into chemistry teachers’ knowledge of chemistry curriculum. International Journal of Emerging Science and Engineering, 9(1), 30–34.
     Google Scholar
  37. Parveen, A. & Khan, M. A. G. (2011). Effect of counselling on the need-achievement, study habits and academic achievement of underachievers [Doctoral dissertation, Ph. D Thesis]. University of Kashmir.
     Google Scholar
  38. Phelan, P., Davidson, A. L. & Cao, H. T. (1991). Students' multiple worlds: negotiating the boundaries of family, peer, and school cultures. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 22(3), 224–250.
     Google Scholar
  39. Plunkett, M. & Kronborg, L. (2007). Gifted Education in Australia: A Story of Striving for Balance. Gifted Education International, 23(1), 72–83.
     Google Scholar
  40. Reis, S. M., Colbert, R. D. & Hébert, T. P. (2005). Understanding resilience in diverse, talented students in an urban high school. Roeper Review, 27, 110–120.
     Google Scholar
  41. Reis, S. M. & Greene, M. J. (2014) Using self-regulated learning to reverse underachievement in talented students. Neag Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development: University of Connecticut.
     Google Scholar
  42. Reis, S. M. & McCoach, D. B. (2000). The underachievement of gifted students: What do we know and where do we go? Gifted Child Quarterly, 44(3), 152–170.
     Google Scholar
  43. Ritchotte, J., Matthews, M., & Flowers, C. (2014). The validity of the achievement-orientation model for gifted middle school students: An exploratory study. Gifted Child Quarterly, 58, 183–198.
     Google Scholar
  44. Rule, B. (2006) Using peer coaches to explain and tackle the underachievement of gifted students. The National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth. Available online at http://www.nagty.ac.uk/research/practitioner_research/developing_expertise_awards_05_06.aspx. Accessed on 30.01.2022.
     Google Scholar
  45. Rutter, M. (1981). Stress, coping and development: some issues and some questions. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 22(4), 323–356.
     Google Scholar
  46. Schick, H. & Phillipson, S. N. (2009). Learning motivation and performance excellence in adolescents with high intellectual potential: What really matters? High Ability Studies, 20, 15–37.
     Google Scholar
  47. Scull, T.M., Kupersmidt, J. B., & Weatherholt, T. N. (2017). The effectiveness of online, family based media literacy education for substance abuse prevention in elementary school children: Study of the media detective family program. Journal of Community Psychology, 45, 796–809.
     Google Scholar
  48. Sharp, L. A & Clemmer, P (2015). The Neglected Readers: Differentiating Instruction for Academically Gifted and Talented Learners. The Journal of Balanced Literacy Research and Instruction, 3(1), 17–21.
     Google Scholar
  49. Smutney, J. (2004). Meeting the needs of gifted underachievers-individually. Davidson Institute for Talent. Available online at https://www.davidsongifted.org/search-database/entry/a10442. Accessed on 04.02.2022.
     Google Scholar
  50. Snyder, K. E, Carlton J. F., Kai, J., Pittard, C. M., Barr, S. M. & Patall, E. A. (2019). Interventions for Academically Underachieving Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Educational Research Review, 28, 1–22.
     Google Scholar
  51. Stoeger, H., Ziegler, A., & Martzog, P. (2008). Deficits in fine motor skill as an important factor in the identification of gifted underachievers in primary school. Psychology Science Quarterly, 50, 134–146.
     Google Scholar
  52. Suan, J. F. (2014). Factors affecting underachievement in mathematics. Proceeding of the Global Summit on Education (GSE), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
     Google Scholar
  53. Sword, L. (2004). Characteristics of the gifted underachiever. Available online at http://wwwgiftedservices.com.au. Accessed on 15.02.2022.
     Google Scholar
  54. Tayyaba, M. A, Ijaz, A., & Ikram, H. (2017). Exploring the factors responsible for declining students’ interest in Chemistry. International Journal of Information and Education Technology, 7(2), 88–94.
     Google Scholar
  55. Tsai, K. F. & Fu, G. (2016). Underachievement in gifted students: a case study of three college physics students in Taiwan. Universal Journal of Educational Research, 4(4), 688–695.
     Google Scholar
  56. Thummaphan, P., Yoelao, D., Suwanmonkha, S. & Damsuwan, W. (2013). The effects of using a program applying self-regulation in combination with teacher’s social support on learning behaviors of underachieving primary students. The Journal of Behavioral Science, 8(1), 1–16.
     Google Scholar
  57. Valentine, J. C., Dubois, D. L. & Cooper, H. (2004). The relationship between self‐ beliefs and academic achievement: A meta‐analytic review. Educational Psychologist, 39(2), 111–133.
     Google Scholar
  58. Wang, C. W. & Neihart, M. (2015). Academic self-concept and academic self-efficacy: self-beliefs enable academic achievement of twice-exceptional students. Roeper Review, 37(2), 63–73.
     Google Scholar
  59. Watters, J. J. & Diezmann, C. M. (2003). The gifted student in science: fulfilling potential. Australian Science Teachers Journal, 49(3), 46–53.
     Google Scholar
  60. Woodrow, D. (1996). Cultural inclination towards studying mathematics and sciences. New Community, 22(1), 23–38.
     Google Scholar
  61. Yamada, Y., Klugar, M., Ivanova, K. & Oborna, I. (2014). Psychological distress and academic self-perception among international medical students: the role of peer social support. BMC Medical Education, 14, 256.
     Google Scholar